Little man
Everything that inspires me.
Disclaimer: I don't take credit for photos I didn't take, and quotes I didn't make. That is against my philosophy of Art. Go to my personal blog for my own shit.
Little man
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newtogger:

Sexy man on screen. Luke Gulbranson on set for By my Hand. 
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via #BeFunky iPhone http://goo.gl/jy6LM
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ethnician via #BeFunky iPhone http://goo.gl/jy6LM
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newtogger:

When you’ve stayed up for three days doing homework and art and you’re finally done with SCAD finals.

When you’ve finally finished moving all your shit into storage and then you realize you have to drive for 4 hours. 
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LAWL
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artsfortransit:


In honor of the Grand Central centennial, we would like to highlight Arts for Transit’s permanent artworkthroughout GCT. First up, artist Ellen Driscoll who referenced the historic constellation ceiling from the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal in her glass, bronze and mosaic relief, As Above, So Below. Located in the Grand Central North passageway, her artwork takes the viewer around the world to the night sky above five different continents, representing myths, civilization, heavens, and the underworld. A close look at any of the faces in the work reveals their diversity, as indeed, the people in these mosaics represent many different backgrounds. However, the artist has altered them to take on the attributes of mythical figures. The work summons the everlasting and the ephemeral, reminding us of our worldly past while we hurry through the station.
Above: Ellen Driscoll, As Above, So Below, 1998.
artsfortransit:


In honor of the Grand Central centennial, we would like to highlight Arts for Transit’s permanent artworkthroughout GCT. First up, artist Ellen Driscoll who referenced the historic constellation ceiling from the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal in her glass, bronze and mosaic relief, As Above, So Below. Located in the Grand Central North passageway, her artwork takes the viewer around the world to the night sky above five different continents, representing myths, civilization, heavens, and the underworld. A close look at any of the faces in the work reveals their diversity, as indeed, the people in these mosaics represent many different backgrounds. However, the artist has altered them to take on the attributes of mythical figures. The work summons the everlasting and the ephemeral, reminding us of our worldly past while we hurry through the station.
Above: Ellen Driscoll, As Above, So Below, 1998.
artsfortransit:


In honor of the Grand Central centennial, we would like to highlight Arts for Transit’s permanent artworkthroughout GCT. First up, artist Ellen Driscoll who referenced the historic constellation ceiling from the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal in her glass, bronze and mosaic relief, As Above, So Below. Located in the Grand Central North passageway, her artwork takes the viewer around the world to the night sky above five different continents, representing myths, civilization, heavens, and the underworld. A close look at any of the faces in the work reveals their diversity, as indeed, the people in these mosaics represent many different backgrounds. However, the artist has altered them to take on the attributes of mythical figures. The work summons the everlasting and the ephemeral, reminding us of our worldly past while we hurry through the station.
Above: Ellen Driscoll, As Above, So Below, 1998.
artsfortransit:


In honor of the Grand Central centennial, we would like to highlight Arts for Transit’s permanent artworkthroughout GCT. First up, artist Ellen Driscoll who referenced the historic constellation ceiling from the main concourse of Grand Central Terminal in her glass, bronze and mosaic relief, As Above, So Below. Located in the Grand Central North passageway, her artwork takes the viewer around the world to the night sky above five different continents, representing myths, civilization, heavens, and the underworld. A close look at any of the faces in the work reveals their diversity, as indeed, the people in these mosaics represent many different backgrounds. However, the artist has altered them to take on the attributes of mythical figures. The work summons the everlasting and the ephemeral, reminding us of our worldly past while we hurry through the station.
Above: Ellen Driscoll, As Above, So Below, 1998.
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damnnlyssa:

yo salt
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Q: Your food posts are killing me, man!
Asked by thecatisaliveandveryangry
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delightfultaste:

Spanish Chicken with Chorizo and Potatoes
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basilgenovese:

Prosciutto-Wrapped Truffle Fries